Not Admissible Evidence without an Expert

… from Wiki …
In 2012, the Union of Concerned Scientists, which tracks ongoing safety issues at operating nuclear plants, found that “leakage of radioactive materials is a pervasive problem at almost 90 percent of all reactors, as are issues that pose a risk of nuclear accidents“.

Following the Japanese Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, according to Black & Veatch’s annual utility survey that took place after the disaster, of the 700 executives from the US electric utility industry that were surveyed, nuclear safety was the top concern.[4] There are likely to be increased requirements for on-site spent fuel management and elevated design basis threats at nuclear power plants.[5][6]

License extensions for existing reactors will face additional scrutiny, with outcomes depending on the degree to which plants can meet new requirements, and some of the extensions already granted for more than 60 of the 104 operating U.S. reactors could be revisited.

On-site storage, consolidated long-term storage, and geological disposal of spent fuel is “likely to be reevaluated in a new light because of the Fukushima storage pool experience”.[5]

In October 2011, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission instructed agency staff to move forward with seven of the 12 safety recommendations put forward by the federal task force in July. The recommendations include “new standards aimed at strengthening operators’ ability to deal with a complete loss of power, ensuring plants can withstand floods and earthquakes and improving emergency response capabilities”. The new safety standards will take up to five years to fully implement.[7]

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